Professional Wrestling is (a) REAL (Money Maker)

imagesSince 1980, professional wrestling has been a staple in the American vernacular with the creation of the WWF, or the World Wrestling Federation. Prior to that, there were regional wrestling companies like NWA (National Wrestling Alliance); they were all over the country. There was the WCCW (World Class Championship Wrestling) based out of Dallas, featuring the famous wrestling family the Von Erich’s, and the most famous of all regionals, WCW (World Championship Wrestling), which was based out of Atlanta, Georgia, that was financed by TBS mogul, Ted Turner. In the future, wrestling would be shaped by the “Monday Night Wars” between WCW and the WWF. This created a new genre of wrestling, the so called “Attitude Era,” where sex, innuendo, and excess were touted. The same old story was told in both companies.

Ok, so you want to know the ONE, big question?

WHY DO MEN OBSESSIVELY WATCH PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING?

I mean, everyone knows, it’s fake, scripted, choreographed, and that it is NOT REAL. So why watch it? Women have their “reality shows”, so why can’t men?

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WWE

Each week, men love to watch that soap opera known among the brethren as Monday Night Raw. The classic case of “good vs. evil,” or that truth and honesty overcome all the odds. With names like John Cena, Daniel Bryan, and newcomer Roman Reigns, the WWE has several men to carry that torch. They are called “baby faces,” or good guys. Generally, the crowd cheers for the good guys and boo the “bad guys.”

The “heels,” or bad guys, are plentiful in the WWESeth Rollins, Big Show, Kane, Rusev, Triple H and Stephanie McMahon are the top “heels” in WWE. Seth Rollins is a hated man among the WWE Universe; he is the poster boy for bad guy. He “wins” matches by cheating, or by having his henchmen cheat for him by causing distractions and/or interfering. Of course the referee, ever oblivious, always misses the cheating. The “face” would never stoop down to cheating to win, so he plays by the rules, while the “heel” defies every rule in the book.

The way a match is “booked” determines who will win that particular match. Usually, the “heels” win during regular “free tv” events, and the “faces” win during PPV events. This is booked so that the viewer will want to see the “heel” get his/her comeuppance. Pay Per Views were, and still are, very expensive to purchase; most are around $40-60 depending on the event. What the WWE has done is genius. They have created the WWE Network for your mobile device. For only $9.99, the consumer can see any wrestling programming from WWE/WCE/WWF for that same flat rate. The clincher is, that ALL PPVs are included in this flat rate. So, whether you watch Hell In A Cell, or the Grandaddy of ’em all, Wrestlemania, it costs you nothing. If you were to purchase each PPV individually, and you bought 5 different PPVs, you would spend around $300. By purchasing the WWE Network for your mobile device, you will be out $120 for the entire YEAR’S worth of programming, AND all the PPVs.

As of Monday night, 3-9-15, the WWE App has been downloaded nearly 16 million times. 16 MILLION. If just half of those people purchase the WWE Network, that’s $79,920,000 in Vince McMahon’s large pockets.

Merchandise sales are another way to generate monies. In every sold out arena across the USA, you will see John Cena, Daniel Bryan, Sting, Roman Reigns and other stars’ t-shirts being worn. They are sold by the TON at WWE Live events.  If the average attendance at a live show is 15,000 people, at least half will want a t-shirt for themselves or for their kids in attendance. Most t-shirts fall in the $22-26 dollar range. So let’s try some math. If I sell 6,000 t-shirts, that’s $144,000 for ONE NIGHT’s work. I haven’t even started on the other items for sale: replica championship belts, caps, towels, commemorative cups, concessions…the WWE is a money-making machine.

Some of the more popular wrestler’s salaries are:

Wrestler Yearly Salary Bonus Contract
John Cena $2.75 Million 6.25% Merchandise Sales, Travel/Accommodations 10 years
Big Show  $1 Million Personal Tour Bus 10 years
Kane $905,000 First Class Travel/Accommodation 5 years
Randy Orton $1.6 Million Personal Travel Tour Bus 10 years
CM Punk $1.2 Million Personal Tour Bus & First Class Travel/Accommodations 7 year
Daniel Bryan  $620,470  3 years

The Divas’ salaries include:

Wrestler Yearly Salary Bonus Contract
Alicia Fox  $72,520 3 years
AJ Lee $104,300 3 years
Beth Phoenix $112,500 First Class Travel 3 years
Eve  $109,475 First Class Travel 5 years
Layla $86,450 3 years
Natalya  $74,410 3 years

Wrestling achieved its popularity in thanks to the Monday Night Wars between Ted Turner’s WCW and Vince McMahon’s WWF, as it was called back then.

Things were looking bleak for WWF in the mid-1990s. In 1996, Nitro began to draw better ratings than Raw based on the strength of the nWo storyline, an anarchist wrestling stable that wanted to take over WCW. Nitro continued to beat Raw for 84 consecutive weeks, forcing Vince McMahon to change the way he did business.

Thus, the “Attitude Era” was born. Filled with cursing, sex, innuendo and flat-out brutality, this is what finally turned the tide on WCW. WWF/E began beating WCW weekly, and attendance started slipping at some of the live events. Eventually, Ted Turner decided he did not want to invest any more money into a sinking ship.

Repetitive story lines, questionable booking issues, and corporate restrictions eventually led WCW to begin losing large amounts of money, leading to parent company AOL Time Warner selling the name copyright to the WWF for $2.5 million in 2001. Shortly after the purchase, Vince McMahon purchased the entire tape library for an additional $1.7 million, bringing the final tally of World Championship Wrestling‘s sale to $4.2 million.

And then there was one.

In 2002, a lawsuit initiated by the World Wildlife Fund over the trademark of WWF was settled in favor of the Wildlife Fund over the misuse of a previously agreed upon usage for the trademark. World Wrestling Federation was forced to rename/rebrand itself, and in May 2002, the company changed its business name to World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

Their only “competition” at this date is TNA wrestling, which is small. In fact, small enough that the WWE does not even acknowledge their existence.

Why do men watch professional wrestling? Is it for the scantily clad Divas? Is it for the excitement? Or is it simply because it’s brainless entertainment? Watch it next Monday night for an hour before tuning into @TweetTheScoop Radio, and then tell me what you think.

It’s an athletic soap opera for men. How else can you explain how a 5’10”, 180lb. man can defeat a man who is 6’8”, 330lbs.? Very carefully.


Ronnie Garcia is the Voice of Reason at The Scoop. He is also an avid guitarist, educator, and all around smarmy guy. You can follow him on twitter @TheRonMann.

*Salary & compensation data via TSMPlug.com

 

 

 

Why Would We Change Baseball?

With a tip of the cap to the NHL, NBA, and NCAA, baseball season is right around the corner.

I thought it was time to check out the goings-on in MLB, courtesy of new Major League Baseball commissioner Rob Manfred. It seems like Mr. Manfred wants to change things up a little.

1280x720_Manfred5_b3jp9tja_8b6x0xowFrom expanding the strike zone to quickening the pace of baseball games, he’s come up with something that might just hit the spot! Manfred would like to shorten the regular season by 8 games. Some of his ideas are pretty spot on.

In an online article from draysbay.com, Mr. Manfred makes some valid points:

“Injuries and fatigue take their toll after 150 games into any baseball season. The 2011 Red Sox and the 2014 Brewers are the latest examples of teams who seemed primed for greatness but couldn’t survive September. Baseball is a grind, an everyday sport designed to tax teams and players until October.

Changing the length of the season will fundamentally change the personnel requirement for teams to make the playoffs, possibly requiring less depth for any roster. Should baseball be a sport where you have to outlast as much as you outplay? That’s its current DNA, and you have to wonder how much eight games taken off the schedule would change that.”

While some valid points exist, are those extra 8 games supposed to allow for more rest?

What happens when we expand the playoffs? Imagine a scenario in which the Wild Card does not take two play-in games? Secondly, imagine a scenario where the Wild Card is actually an (elimination) tournament a few days before playoffs begin, like say a week?

Major League Baseball is a sport driven by money. Not just consumer money, but by television revenue. Quick question, just how much more valuable are those 8 games as added revenue?

In 2013, Major League Baseball made in excess of $8 Billion dollars. ($8,000,000,000.00) It is estimated that MLB made a little over $9 Billion this past year. Baseball is a money-making venture, so shortening it by 8 games may not seem like much to you or me, but to an owner? That’s money out of his/her pockets.

In 2014, the average ticket price went up by 2%, to an average of $27.93 per ticket. The total FCI (Fan Cost Index) rose 2.3%, to $212.46. (Understand some tickets are cheaper than this, and others are far more expensive.)

If you take the Texas Rangers, for example, and use this formula: average cost of ticket x total attendance = $$ in pocket of owners, you reach a total of nearly $76M ($27.93 x 2,718,733 = $75,934,212.69).

I think I’m in the wrong business. Really.

If you want to shorten the season, you’re going to have a fight on your hands from the baseball purists. They ALREADY hate the DH in the American League…can’t imagine they’d like a shortened season. It makes sense, and then it doesn’t.

If you can guarantee fresh players for the playoffs, then bring it on. Otherwise, LEAVE IT ALONE. I know a lot of folks gripe about the length of baseball games. According to a recent, well-researched and very entertaining Boston Globe story, major league game times are longer than they used to be, reversing a trend. They’re back up to an average of nearly 2 hours, 58 minutes.

In contrast, the average NFL game lasts 3 hours and 12 minutes, and NBA games are 2 hours 28 minutes long.

So baseball games aren’t as long as football games, nor are they as short as NBA games. So,why the griping about the pace of the game? 1.) The amount of standing around. 2.) The inordinate amount of time batters use to prepare to hit the ball. 3.) 27 Outs can take a long time, especially if the pitcher isn’t very good, or you play in a homerun park.

Would you want to make the game more exciting? What ideas do you have, if any, to change the pace of the game?

Give me your suggestions @TheRonMann

I am, the Voice of Reason.


Ronnie Garcia is the Voice of Reason at The Scoop. He is also an avid guitarist, educator, and all around smarmy guy. You can follow him on twitter @TheRonMann.