Could the Finals MVP be a Loser?

There’s a saying that the hardest truths to see in life are the ones that are staring you straight in the face, right in front of you. Don’t quote me on that.

With regards to who should be this year’s NBA Finals MVP, the answer is so glaringly obvious that I’m surprised anyone would actually try and say otherwise. What’s the counter-argument?

“Oh, well, a member of the losing team hasn’t been Finals MVP since 1923.” Or whenever.

NBA.com
NBA.com
It’s 1969, actually, and the man to do it was Jerry West. His Lakers lost the series in seven games, but he led all players in the series in minutes, field goals, free throws, defensive rebounds, assists and points.

That’s pretty much exactly what LeBron James is doing. I don’t see how even the most irrational of LeBron haters can go to bed at night after watching him in this series without having gained a little more respect for him.

We shouldn’t forget that Golden State was ranked No. 1 in overall in defensive efficiency throughout the regular season. When the Finals started a week ago, I was a bit stunned to see LeBron begin to pick them apart like he did, and then to see him do it again and again.

USATSI
USATSI
Golden State hasn’t been in a position this year where the same team gets to game plan for you a maximum of seven separate times. We shouldn’t be surprised that this is happening, especially with a player like LeBron who is so hell-bent on delivering a title to Cleveland AND having to do it with a supporting cast from the local YMCA.

It reminds me of what Russell Westbrook did earlier in the year during his ridiculous run of triple-doubles. He had no other choice but to carry his team and the numbers reflected what needed to be done.

If we’re going to hold the term “Finals MVP” to what it really means, then yes, absolutely LeBron is the Finals MVP. Cleveland would be losing every game by 25 points without him. With him, they STILL have a chance to win the series against a far superior opponent, albeit one without any prior Finals experience.

AP Photo/Ben Margot
AP Photo/Ben Margot
Stephen Curry or Andre Iguodala would be the only other viable candidates at this point, and I received a hearty dose of skeptical laughter after I suggested the latter at a Game 5 watch party, but really, Iguodala has been LeBron‘s kryptonite for the last three games.

He nearly had a triple-double in Game 5, and Steve Kerr even calls him his “security blanket.” His veteran moxie and experience have been essential to Golden State not collectively crapping themselves on the biggest stage in the league with the world’s best player on the other end doing his absolute utmost to will the Cavs to a title.

Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports
Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports
Curry showed in Game 5 why, if LeBron doesn’t win the award, he is the most deserving of the award. His ball-handling, composure and shot-making ability combined to liven the Warriors’ collective spirits and give them the final boost of energy needed to put away a Cleveland team which refuses to die, even they were running on fumes just days ago.

For those who cast the ballots at the end of this series, which I think will be Tuesday, they shouldn’t let 46 years of history sway them from picking LeBron. If we’re taking the award for what it is, then LeBron is the clear-cut choice, no questions asked.

It would be an injustice to pick anyone else.


Zack Cunningham is a Contributor at The Scoop. Follow him on Twitter at @Zackerson.

 

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