Category Archives: Life

Baseball Fan Rules

NY Post
NY Post

I have been going to baseball games since 1985. As a fan, I have noticed over the years that there are many unwritten rules that are not being followed by spectators.

As of today, they are unwritten no longer! I am going to lay down the law.

Orange County Register
Orange County Register

1. You cannot wear a jersey for a player that is no longer on your team unless said player is retired. Example: Texas Rangers fans still showing up at games wearing Josh Hamilton jerseys. I don’t care if you still like the guy, but he’s on another team and thus the enemy.

2. If you are a grown man, don’t bring a glove to the game. You have hands. Use them. Plus, it impresses the ladies more when you barehand catch a ball.

MLB.tv
MLB.tv

3. Attention all grown-ups: If you catch a foul ball give it to the nearest kid. Trust me, they will value it way more than you ever will.

4. Unless you are at Wrigley Field, stop throwing visiting home run balls back. That’s a Cubs tradition. Plus, it’s just plain stupid.

5. Do I really have to tell you not to do the wave?

AP Photo/Winslow Townson
AP Photo/Winslow Townson

6. This is actually a written rule: You don’t have to remove your cap during God Bless America. That’s only done during our National Anthem and the playing of Taps. I only say this because I have had fans get mad at me for not doing so.

7. If you have to go to the bathroom, let a friend hold on to your drink. With all the nastiness that floats in the air, do you really want to bring your beer into the restroom?

sleeping man8. Ladies, we are there to watch the game. Please stop telling stories about what happened at work yesterday. Guys, if your woman wants to tell stories that don’t pertain to the game all game long, then you need a new woman.

9. Unless you’re a writer covering the game or live-tweeting it, stay off your phone. Do you love the thrill of possibly being hit by a foul ball? Plus, do you really need to take 20 photos of the field every time you go to a game? I usually take 1 or 2 just to make my friends jealous.

The Big Lead

10. I don’t know why I have to tell you this, but sit in the seat that is on your ticket. I hate showing up (even before the game starts) and someone is in my seat. It’s just rude.

If you have any more to add, or just want to complain, shoot me a message on Twitter @JamesHollandTX.

Until next time, I’ll see you in the cheap seats!


James Holland is a Sports Contributor at The Scoop. Follow him on Twitter at @JamesHollandTX.

 

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Professional Wrestling is (a) REAL (Money Maker)

imagesSince 1980, professional wrestling has been a staple in the American vernacular with the creation of the WWF, or the World Wrestling Federation. Prior to that, there were regional wrestling companies like NWA (National Wrestling Alliance); they were all over the country. There was the WCCW (World Class Championship Wrestling) based out of Dallas, featuring the famous wrestling family the Von Erich’s, and the most famous of all regionals, WCW (World Championship Wrestling), which was based out of Atlanta, Georgia, that was financed by TBS mogul, Ted Turner. In the future, wrestling would be shaped by the “Monday Night Wars” between WCW and the WWF. This created a new genre of wrestling, the so called “Attitude Era,” where sex, innuendo, and excess were touted. The same old story was told in both companies.

Ok, so you want to know the ONE, big question?

WHY DO MEN OBSESSIVELY WATCH PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING?

I mean, everyone knows, it’s fake, scripted, choreographed, and that it is NOT REAL. So why watch it? Women have their “reality shows”, so why can’t men?

wwe_default
WWE

Each week, men love to watch that soap opera known among the brethren as Monday Night Raw. The classic case of “good vs. evil,” or that truth and honesty overcome all the odds. With names like John Cena, Daniel Bryan, and newcomer Roman Reigns, the WWE has several men to carry that torch. They are called “baby faces,” or good guys. Generally, the crowd cheers for the good guys and boo the “bad guys.”

The “heels,” or bad guys, are plentiful in the WWESeth Rollins, Big Show, Kane, Rusev, Triple H and Stephanie McMahon are the top “heels” in WWE. Seth Rollins is a hated man among the WWE Universe; he is the poster boy for bad guy. He “wins” matches by cheating, or by having his henchmen cheat for him by causing distractions and/or interfering. Of course the referee, ever oblivious, always misses the cheating. The “face” would never stoop down to cheating to win, so he plays by the rules, while the “heel” defies every rule in the book.

The way a match is “booked” determines who will win that particular match. Usually, the “heels” win during regular “free tv” events, and the “faces” win during PPV events. This is booked so that the viewer will want to see the “heel” get his/her comeuppance. Pay Per Views were, and still are, very expensive to purchase; most are around $40-60 depending on the event. What the WWE has done is genius. They have created the WWE Network for your mobile device. For only $9.99, the consumer can see any wrestling programming from WWE/WCE/WWF for that same flat rate. The clincher is, that ALL PPVs are included in this flat rate. So, whether you watch Hell In A Cell, or the Grandaddy of ’em all, Wrestlemania, it costs you nothing. If you were to purchase each PPV individually, and you bought 5 different PPVs, you would spend around $300. By purchasing the WWE Network for your mobile device, you will be out $120 for the entire YEAR’S worth of programming, AND all the PPVs.

As of Monday night, 3-9-15, the WWE App has been downloaded nearly 16 million times. 16 MILLION. If just half of those people purchase the WWE Network, that’s $79,920,000 in Vince McMahon’s large pockets.

Merchandise sales are another way to generate monies. In every sold out arena across the USA, you will see John Cena, Daniel Bryan, Sting, Roman Reigns and other stars’ t-shirts being worn. They are sold by the TON at WWE Live events.  If the average attendance at a live show is 15,000 people, at least half will want a t-shirt for themselves or for their kids in attendance. Most t-shirts fall in the $22-26 dollar range. So let’s try some math. If I sell 6,000 t-shirts, that’s $144,000 for ONE NIGHT’s work. I haven’t even started on the other items for sale: replica championship belts, caps, towels, commemorative cups, concessions…the WWE is a money-making machine.

Some of the more popular wrestler’s salaries are:

Wrestler Yearly Salary Bonus Contract
John Cena $2.75 Million 6.25% Merchandise Sales, Travel/Accommodations 10 years
Big Show  $1 Million Personal Tour Bus 10 years
Kane $905,000 First Class Travel/Accommodation 5 years
Randy Orton $1.6 Million Personal Travel Tour Bus 10 years
CM Punk $1.2 Million Personal Tour Bus & First Class Travel/Accommodations 7 year
Daniel Bryan  $620,470  3 years

The Divas’ salaries include:

Wrestler Yearly Salary Bonus Contract
Alicia Fox  $72,520 3 years
AJ Lee $104,300 3 years
Beth Phoenix $112,500 First Class Travel 3 years
Eve  $109,475 First Class Travel 5 years
Layla $86,450 3 years
Natalya  $74,410 3 years

Wrestling achieved its popularity in thanks to the Monday Night Wars between Ted Turner’s WCW and Vince McMahon’s WWF, as it was called back then.

Things were looking bleak for WWF in the mid-1990s. In 1996, Nitro began to draw better ratings than Raw based on the strength of the nWo storyline, an anarchist wrestling stable that wanted to take over WCW. Nitro continued to beat Raw for 84 consecutive weeks, forcing Vince McMahon to change the way he did business.

Thus, the “Attitude Era” was born. Filled with cursing, sex, innuendo and flat-out brutality, this is what finally turned the tide on WCW. WWF/E began beating WCW weekly, and attendance started slipping at some of the live events. Eventually, Ted Turner decided he did not want to invest any more money into a sinking ship.

Repetitive story lines, questionable booking issues, and corporate restrictions eventually led WCW to begin losing large amounts of money, leading to parent company AOL Time Warner selling the name copyright to the WWF for $2.5 million in 2001. Shortly after the purchase, Vince McMahon purchased the entire tape library for an additional $1.7 million, bringing the final tally of World Championship Wrestling‘s sale to $4.2 million.

And then there was one.

In 2002, a lawsuit initiated by the World Wildlife Fund over the trademark of WWF was settled in favor of the Wildlife Fund over the misuse of a previously agreed upon usage for the trademark. World Wrestling Federation was forced to rename/rebrand itself, and in May 2002, the company changed its business name to World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

Their only “competition” at this date is TNA wrestling, which is small. In fact, small enough that the WWE does not even acknowledge their existence.

Why do men watch professional wrestling? Is it for the scantily clad Divas? Is it for the excitement? Or is it simply because it’s brainless entertainment? Watch it next Monday night for an hour before tuning into @TweetTheScoop Radio, and then tell me what you think.

It’s an athletic soap opera for men. How else can you explain how a 5’10”, 180lb. man can defeat a man who is 6’8”, 330lbs.? Very carefully.


Ronnie Garcia is the Voice of Reason at The Scoop. He is also an avid guitarist, educator, and all around smarmy guy. You can follow him on twitter @TheRonMann.

*Salary & compensation data via TSMPlug.com

 

 

 

Fight: Saying Goodbye to Stuart Scott

This is a special contribution from CEO & Founder, Jamie Kelly.

A giant fell today. One of my heroes. A man whose story would become more important to me than I could have ever imagined.

Stuart Scott died today.

USATSI
USATSI

When Stuart Scott came onto the national scene, he brought a fun, never-heard-before voice to sports broadcasting. As a working sports television journalist in the late 1990s, there were a handful of personalities from whom I drew inspiration; Scott and his ESPN colleague Chris Berman were the voices I identified with the most. They just seemed to have fun with every moment, making every stat and recap seem electric, and making me laugh even when my team had suffered a crushing blow.

I tried to emulate that spirit during my three-year stint on Soccer News USA, which aired on Fox Sports Southwest and the Pax Network. I wanted the viewers at home to feel my energy through the screen, and to know that I loved every second of my time with them each week. While the show didn’t survive for the long-haul, that inspiration never died. Here we are nearly 20 years later, and I still hear Stuart Scott cracking jokes in my mind when we go on the air for The Scoop Radio on Monday nights.

But that’s not where the story ends for me. This is personal.

When the news of Scott’s passing came out this morning, I was laying in bed feeling sorry for myself because I couldn’t grip my coffee cup… again. This is fairly normal for someone with Fibromyalgia; I drop things pretty regularly because my hands just “let go.” That part frustrates the hell out of me. I remember falling to pieces in a crying, snotty, lump of human being when I dropped one of my daughter’s bottles during a middle-of-the-night feeding when she was an infant.

My body is my worst enemy. Some days I have difficulty dressing myself. Some days I’ll be driving in my own neighborhood and have to pull over and collect my thoughts to figure out where I am. Many days are good, but the vast majority are not. That’s where Scott inspired me once again. Even when he was fighting the battle of his life, he went on camera and made us smile. I watched him religiously, and sat in awe, wondering how he drew the strength to share himself with the world, when he was struggling so mightily in his personal life. It would be so much easier to shut down and shut the world out, something I have done more times than I care to admit.

IMG_8509

When I became a parent a few years ago, I knew immediately where the drew his strength from. I never felt more connected to a man I’d never met than when he spoke of his daughters. I finally got it. When you’re a parent, it’s not about you anymore. You fight not for yourself, but for a little human who thinks you hung the moon.

As I laid in my bed feeling sorry for myself for having yet another rough day, the news of Scott’s passing was a crushing blow. It was the last thing any of us wanted to hear this morning. Yes, I cried. And cried. And am still crying. But just as quickly as the tears came, the determination stormed in.  Fibromyalgia sucks, but cancer? Cancer?! I could picture that signature Stuart Scott smirk as I told myself, “GET YOUR SHIT TOGETHER, GIRL!

ESPN
ESPN

Stuart Scott may be gone, but the gifts he gave us will never die. Inspiration lives within your soul and becomes part of your fabric. His legacy to all of us is that he taught us how to fight. And fight, I will.


Jamie Kelly is the Founder and CEO of The Scoop, and host of The Scoop Radio on Monday nights on KTSR. Follow her on Twitter at @JamieSportsTalk.